Research on Crops

Research on Crops
Research on Crops

Our works across a range of staple food crops on which world food supply depends, and especially staple crops important in the food economies of poorer nations. Our research aims to make supplies of basic foods in developing countries dependable and to lessen poverty. Improving the productivity and the quality of the crops farmers grow and the ways they grow them helps farmers in developing countries in several ways. They produce more, and what they produce has better quality and is more nutritious. This leads to better health and opens up opportunities to become part of global market chains. Crops fetch better prices and so farmers earn more and inject more cash into rural economies, driving rural development. Better cropping practices protect the environment, use natural resources wisely and mean that farmers are better prepared to deal with variable and changing climatic conditions.

You can find out about the origin and use of the crops we research, their production and nutritional value, how Our Research Centers have improved these crops and the difference this has made, by following the links below. You will also find links to sources of further information.

Crop fact sheets

Banana and plantain

Bananas and plantains are important staple foods for nearly 400 million people in many developing countries, especially in Africa.
Bananas and plantains (Musa spp. L.) are important staple foods for nearly 400 million people in many developing countries, especially in Africa. Total global production ranks fourth after maize, rice and wheat. In the East African highlands, consumption may be as high as 1 kilogram per person per day. Of the numerous edible varieties, the East African Highland Banana (EAHB) accounts for 17% of the types of Musa grown worldwide and plantain accounts for another 19%. There are 120 EAHB varieties in Uganda alone that are not found anywhere else in the world.
Barley

Barley ranks fourth among the cereals in worldwide production and is grown annually on 48 million hectares in a wide range of environments.

Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) ranks fourth among the cereals in worldwide production and is grown annually on 48 million hectares in a wide range of environments. In some developing countries, barley is mostly grown by resource-poor farmers in marginal environments, receiving modest or no inputs.
Common bean

Common bean is the most important grain legume in human diets. It provides protein, complex carbohydrates, and valuable micronutrients for more than 300 million people in the tropics.

Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important grain legume in human diets. It provides protein, complex carbohydrates, and valuable micronutrients for more than 300 million people in the tropics. In many areas, common bean is the second most important source of calories after maize. Over 200 million people in sub-Saharan Africa depend on the crop as a primary staple, which is cultivated largely by women. Furthermore, millions of small-scale farmers in Latin America and Africa rely on the production and sale of beans as an important source of household income.
Cassava

Cassava is grown in over 90 countries and is the third most important source of calories in the tropics, after rice and maize.

Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important grain legume in Asia, and being a rich and cheap source of protein can help people improve the nutritional quality of their diets. Chickpea is of relatively minor importance on the world market but it is extremely important for local trade in numerous tropical and subtropical regions. It is grown and consumed in large quantities from South East Asia to India and in the Middle East and Mediterranean countries. It ranks second in area and third in production among the pulses worldwide.

Chickpea

Chickpea is an important grain legume in Asia, and being a rich and cheap source of protein can help people improve the nutritional quality of their diets.

Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important grain legume in Asia, and being a rich and cheap source of protein can help people improve the nutritional quality of their diets. Chickpea is of relatively minor importance on the world market but it is extremely important for local trade in numerous tropical and subtropical regions. It is grown and consumed in large quantities from South East Asia to India and in the Middle East and Mediterranean countries. It ranks second in area and third in production among the pulses worldwide.
Cowpea

Cowpea is of vital importance to the livelihoods of millions of people in the semi-arid regions of West and Central Africa. It is the most important grain legume crop in sub-Saharan Africa.

Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) is of vital importance to the livelihoods of millions of people in the semi-arid regions of West and Central Africa. It is the most important grain legume crop in sub-Saharan Africa. Cowpea is mostly grown by smallholders in the hot, drought-prone savannas and very arid Sahelian agro-ecological zones, often intercropped with pearl millet and sorghum. Cowpea is a protein-rich grain that complements staple cereal and starchy tuber crops. It also provides fodder for livestock, improves the soil by fixing nitrogen, and benefits households by bringing in cash and diversifying sources of income. The sale of cowpea stems and leaves for animal feed during the dry season provides vital household income.
Groundnut

Groundnut is known by many names, including peanut, earthnut, monkey nut and poor man’s nut. Although groundnut is native to South America, it is successfully grown in other parts of the world and has become an important oil seed and food crop in tropical, sub-tropical and warm temperate zones.
Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is known by many names, including peanut, earthnut, monkey nut and poor man’s nut. Although groundnut is native to South America, it is successfully grown in other parts of the world and has become an important oil seed and food crop in tropical, sub-tropical and warm temperate zones. Most groundnut is grown in India and China. Millions of smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa also grow groundnut, for food and as a cash crop.
Lentil

Lentil is a short-statured, annual, self-pollinated, high value crop species.
Lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) is a short-statured, annual, self-pollinated, high value crop species. The crop has great significance in cereal-based cropping systems because it fixes nitrogen, the seeds are a high protein food and the straw provides animal feed. In developing countries, lentil is produced on relatively poor soils and in harsh environments. Lentils are an affordable source of protein for poor people.
Millets

Millets – tall grasses with heads of small seeds – grow in harsh environments where other crops generally fail. They are staple crops of many of the poorest people in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa.

Millets – tall grasses with heads of small seeds – grow in harsh environments where other crops generally fail. They are staple crops of many of the poorest people in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.), finger millet (Eleusine coracana L.) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) are the most important millets.

Sorghum

Sorghum is a staple food crop for millions of the poorest and most food-insecure people in the semi-arid tropics of Africa, Asia and Central America.

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) is the world’s fifth major cereal in terms of production and acreage. It is a staple food crop for millions of the poorest and most food-insecure people in the semi-arid tropics of Africa, Asia and Central America. The crop is genetically suited to hot and dry agro-ecologies where it is difficult to grow other food grains. These areas are frequently drought-prone and characterized by fragile environments.

In many of these areas, sorghum is a dual-purpose crop: both grain and stems are highly valued outputs. Sorghum is grown in two broad groups of countries. In the first group (primarily in Asia and Africa), production is traditional, subsistence and small-scale, and sorghum is mainly used for food. Yields are generally low and can vary considerably from year to year. Both yield and quality are affected by a wide array of biotic stresses (pests and diseases) and abiotic stresses such as drought and problematic soils. In the second group (industrialized countries and some developing countries), production is modern, mechanized, high-input and large-scale, sorghum is primarily used for animal feed, and yields are higher.

Wheat

Wheat is grown on more hectares than any other food crop, and is one of the most important sources of calories second only to rice and first as a source of protein for humans in many parts of the world.

Wheat (Triticum spp. L.) is grown on more hectares than any other food crop, and is one of the most important sources of calories second only to rice and first as a source of protein for humans in many parts of the world.

We will shortly be releasing factsheets containing up-to-date information on the following crops: Courtesy cimmyt

Coconut
Maize
Pigeonpea
Potato
Rice
Soybean
Sweet Potato
Yam

Seed, Quality seed, Agriculture, Crops
Published in ZaraiMedia.com

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